Bringing It Home – The Saint Rose Blog

Welcome! It’s Nice to Have You

A warm hello to all College of Saint Rose students, faculty, staff, and members of the general public. As you have no doubt gathered, you have arrived at the institution’s official blog – a project that counts members of the aforementioned groups among its many contributors. Welcome to my personal slice of it.

You may be asking yourself, or perhaps the screen of your digital media delivery device, “Saint Rose, why are you blogging?” Well, there are many answers to that question, but each of them are built upon one central theme: stories. If you’ve spent any time at The College of Saint Rose, you know the institution offers observers a lively campus community with many stories to tell. Be it standout research, campus events, area outreach initiatives, or the daily lives and attitudes of students, there are many events and opinions to share with all of you. I should know – I’ve had the opportunity to view Saint Rose from the prospective of both a student and a professional in the communications field over the past eight years.

Saint Rose students heading back to campus after class

Saint Rose students heading back to campus after class (St. Rose Blog, Steve Felano)

Here’s my rap sheet:

  • Saint Rose Undergraduate Student – Communications (2003 – 2007)
  • Assistant News Director – WAMC Northeast Public Radio (2007 – 2011)
  • Saint Rose Graduate Student – Communications (2010 – present)

Now for my analysis:

  • Saint Rose is one of the best values out there in higher education. You can get an ivy league level education at this school without spending ivy league level money. Like most things in life, it’s just up to you to put in the time and effort to seek out the resources necessary to make that happen.
  • Saint Rose is constantly changing and expanding, but still feels like home. With the communications industry progressing at breakneck speed, it became clear in 2009 that I would need further training to stay competitive in the field. When I returned to Saint Rose in 2010 to receive that training, I felt like I had never left. Major additions like the William Randolph Hearst Center for Communications and Interactive Media had certainly changed the outward appearance of the campus, but the tight-knit community I remembered from my undergrad days was still alive and well.
  • Saint Rose faculty keep students engaged with the world outside Albany. I can’t think of a time over the past eight years when I didn’t walk through the campus activity center and spot a poster for a guest or faculty panel I thought would be compelling. You name the topic – how social media has affected journalism, America’s energy future, the human cost of war – Saint Rose faculty have done something on it. They confront students with contemporary events and dilemmas, and the students respond.
The Massry Center for the Arts opened in 2008

The Massry Center for the Arts opened in 2008 (St. Rose Blog, Steve Felano)

The final point of my analysis is something I’d like to focus on in subsequent posts. Aside from providing critical job skills, higher education is supposed to train students to become engaged citizens who think critically about the world around them. This requires a dedication to learning that doesn’t end after graduation day. Returning to the central theme outlined earlier, this is also the story of The College of Saint Rose – the production of lifelong students.

Going forward, I hope to tell you more about the students who are a part of this story. Special attention will be given to their daily routines, opinions, coursework, and community involvement. I’ll also take time out to draw connections between the college, its students, and contemporary events. When time permits, I’ll try to bring you in on some of my outside interests as well. All things considered, it should be a fun ride. I hope you’ll come along.

Me in the Hearst Center radio control room ahead of a recording session

Me, in the Hearst Center radio control room ahead of a recording session (St. Rose Blog, Steve Felano)

What do you think?

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